‘I hate snorers but that doesn’t mean they should be banned from certain parts of the aircraft’

IndiGoOpinions have always been divided on child-free zones on commercial flights and the issue has come to the fore with India-based budget airline IndiGo announcing quiet zones on all its flights.

IndiGo is not the first to implement this. In 2013, Singapore-based budget carrier Scoot had introduced quiet zones at the front of their aircraft.

“Scoot in peace and quiet when you reserve seats in our ScootinSilence zone located upfront. Besides the exclusivity that you’ll enjoy (the under 12 will be someplace else), you’ll also get additional comfort…,” says the airline’s website.

IndiGo has gone about it in a similar fashion. “Keeping in mind the comfort and convenience of all passengers, rows one to four and 11 to 14 are to be kept as a quiet zone,” said The Telegraph UK quoting an IndiGo statement.

The Indian airline has introduced this feature on its premium seats. Children under 12 will also not be allowed to sit in rows with additional leg room and emergency exits, said reports.

The Western media has widely reported this move and while thousands have supported IndiGo, which has 118 aircraft and flies to 40 destinations, many parents have slammed it.

IT professional Ishita Nair, who frequently flies between her hometown Kolkata and Hyderabad, where she is based for work, supported the concept of quiet zones without children. Ishita is not married and does not have kids.

“After spending the Sunday at home, I often take an early morning flight to Hyderabad and go directly to work from the airport. In those cases, I really need the two hours of sleep on the plane. Also, this is good news for the elderly and sick people who could do with some peace and quiet during flights,” she says.

After spending the Sunday at home, I often take an early morning flight to Hyderabad and go directly to work from the airport. In those cases, I really need the two hours of sleep on the plane. 
— Ishita Nair, IT professional

Amrita Mukherjee, a lawyer and the mother of a two-year-old, has a different point of view. She says, “I don’t think this is fair. I don’t like people who snore on flights but that doesn’t mean they should be banned from certain parts of the aircraft.”

I don’t like people who snore on flights but that doesn’t mean they should be banned from certain parts of the aircraft.
— Amrita Mukherjee, lawyer

A PR professional based in Kolkata, who is single and does not have kids, says, “As a person who travels for work, I sometimes do hope children wouldn’t be crying while I catch up on my sleep, especially on morning flights. But I don’t see a need for this particular rule/scheme. In that case, a lot of other personal choices could also need to be adjusted with.”

I sometimes do hope children wouldn’t be crying while I catch up on my sleep, especially on morning flights. But I don’t see a need for this particular rule/scheme. In that case, a lot of other personal choices could also need to be adjusted with.
A PR professional based in Kolkata

On Twitter, @smillieg says, “Read some rows on flights to be child free in India. Until some parents stop kids kicking seat & screaming, gets my vote. #ChildFreeFlights”

On the other hand, @kirstyannex says, “In relation to the #childfreeflights .. we were all those loud screaming children once #don’tforgetthat”. In reply to @kirstyannex’s tweet, @GabyNatale says, “@kirstyannex I think #ChildFreeFlights is a good idea. I will help business travelers without affecting families or kids.”

Do you support IndiGo’s introduction of children-free ‘quiet zones’ on their aircraft? Share your views in the comments section below.

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